Dark Matter and Dark Energy Not Needed After All?

Big Bang Cosmology is broken! And a couple of physicists have the fix.  Interestingly, one is a young earth creationist and the other is an Israeli.  Just as Newtonian physics was inadequate for explaining the motion of Mercury and other phenomena, so the failure of Big Bang cosmology calls for a New Physics, based on the “Cosmological Special Relativity” of the late Moshe Carmeli. In this fascinating book (2007), Dr. John Hartnett explains how prior to 1915 astronomers proposed ‘dark matter’ or possibly a hidden planet (Vulcan) to explain the slightly anomalous orbit of Mercury. But in 1915, with the publication of Einstein’s general theory of relativity, this problem was solved. In fact, Einstein was able to calculate exactly the 43 arcseconds that had previously been measured. This meant that ‘dark matter’ was unnecessary and all that had been lacking was new, correct physics.

Fast forward to the early 21st century and we have a similar problem when contemplating the universe. It turns out that the amount of mass of objects outside the solar system calculated from two different methods — (a) Newton’s mass equation and (b) mass inferred from the visible luminous material — always disagrees, with the latter being smaller. M/L ratios have been derived for various cosmic objects and the larger the object, the higher the M/L ratio. This has necessitated what Hartnett calls ‘fudge factors’ such as dark matter and dark energy and it surprised me to learn that the percentages of this mysterious dark matter and dark energy are so large in the Friedmann models of the universe — 22% and 74% respectively–with only 4% being normal matter. I don’t know about you, but there seems to be something seriously wrong with this picture. Guess what … there is. In the early 1990′s, a theoretical physicist, Moshe Carmeli, extended Einstein’s theories into a new theory — Cosmological Special Relativity and then his General Theory, which included matter. Hartnett writes …

“In 1996, using his new theory, … Carmeli predicted[11] that the universe must be accelerating. This was almost two years before the observations determined it to be so. Carmeli’s new spacevelocity is an extension to Einstein’s general theory, which incorporates a new dimension, the velocity of the expanding fabric of space itself. His general theory incorporates all of Einstein’s theory that has been found valid for our solar system at least, but extends it to the larger scales of the Galaxy and the cosmos. Using his new metric, Carmeli was able to replicate the form of the observed data from the high redshift type 1a supernova teams. In turn I have been able to extend that treatment and, by properly describing the matter density dependence on redshift, eliminate the need for ‘dark’ matter on the scale of the cosmos as a whole.[13] Also, Carmelian cosmology does not explicitly incorporate a ‘dark’ energy term. ‘Dark’ energy really has resulted from the application of incorrect physics to the large-scale structure of the cosmos. Using the correct physics, what has been perceived as ‘dark’ energy is really a description of the properties of the vacuum itself. Vacuum is not ‘nothing’ and it has properties that the new metric (i.e. the new physics) correctly incorporates (See Appendix 1.)

I have also applied this theory to the actual observational data[14a] [14b] and have found that normal matter density equals only about 4% of the critical matter density of the universe. This is the same as the small amount of normal baryonic matter we observe in the luminous matter. No ‘dark’ matter at all is required. … The fits to the observational data are far better than those used to fit to the standard Friedmann-Lemaitre models. The new Carmeli-Hartnett model eliminates the need for any exotic ‘dark’ matter at all. In fact, the model requires that the universe be of low matter density as observed. (pp. 43-44)

Other goodies in this book …

OUR GALAXY AT THE CENTER OF THE UNIVERSE?

On p. 84-85, Hartnett writes that based on various Galaxy Survey maps …

This means we are located at the centre of concentric great spherical shells, on which the galaxies themselves are located, that seem to be equally spaced with a separation of about one hundred million light-years.

In other words, Hartnett has found evidence that the universe has a center and our galaxy is located close to this center.  See Chapter 5 of his book.

In Chapter 6, Hartnett writes (p. 95) …

One of the consequences of the Carmelian cosmology is that, as a natural consequence of the conservation of energy, particle production must occur.  That is, matter is generated from the vacuum.  This is not creation ex nihilo but a conversion of one form of energy into another. …

He explains the mechanism by which he believes this to occur based on recent work by Halton Arp.  Arp apparently believes that new galaxies are formed by quasars being ejected from existing galaxies.  This is a radical idea because in Big Bang cosmology, quasars are not supposed to be colocated with galaxies, but the evidence is supposedly pretty strong in favor of Arp’s view.   Hartnett writes (p. 101) that …

Observations do, however, fit with the creationist cosmological model proposed in this book.  The quasars are ejected from active galaxies in a grand creation process; and, as we observe the light from quasars today, we are effectively looking back in time (because it takes light a finite period of time to travel to Earth) to these creation events. …

… my interpretation is that we are seeing the creation process in the heavens as it was happening on Day 4 of Creation Week.  We are seeing creation as it happens!

On p. 103, Hartnett states his belief that “the initial radius of the universe was about 8 million light years (possibly less) before God stretched out the heavens on Day 4 of Creation Week.  This indicates that galaxies were initially created much closer to Earth, and that God expanded out the space, dragging them apart.  And as that occurred, new material–additional galaxies, quasars, etc–was created like one of those fireworks displays where we see the exploding embers from the parent explosion in a chain reaction sequence.”  Hartnett shows that the Carmeli-Hartnett model solves the problem of distant starlight in a young universe.

Dr. Hartnett has published more than 120 papers in scientific journals and holds 2 patents. His work in the ongoing development of new physics has attracted the interest, and funding, of his university — the Univ of Western Australia.

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