Josephus on Tillage: Cain ‘Forcing’ the Ground

One of the most serious agricultural problems in the world today is TILLAGE … ‘ploughing’ the ground, and forest clearing which accompanies it. Tillage destroys topsoil, and – eventually – entire civilizations, and as well-known Permaculturist Mark Shepard has shown us, is completely unnecessary for feeding people. In fact, recent studies like this one have shown that food produced from this type of agriculture is generally harmful to the body. How interesting then to discover that the famous Jewish historian Josephus wrote quite unfavorably about the ORIGIN OF TILLAGE. Enjoy!

1. ADAM and Eve had two sons: the elder of them was named Cain; which name, when it is interpreted, signifies a possession: the younger was Abel, which signifies sorrow. They had also daughters. Now the two brethren were pleased with different courses of life: for Abel, the younger, was a lover of righteousness; and believing that God was present at all his actions, he excelled in virtue; and his employment was that of a shepherd. But Cain was not only very wicked in other respects, but was wholly intent upon getting; and he first contrived to plough the ground. He slew his brother on the occasion following : – They had resolved to sacrifice to God. Now Cain brought the fruits of the earth, and of his husbandry; but Abel brought milk, and the first-fruits of his flocks: but God was more delighted with the latter oblation, when he was honored with what grew naturally of its own accord, than he was with what was the invention of a covetous man, and gotten by forcing the ground; whence it was that Cain was very angry that Abel was preferred by God before him; and he slew his brother, and hid his dead body, thinking to escape discovery. LINK HERE

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