Paul and Anne Ehrlich Say that the Sahara Desert is Manmade

The vast Sahara desert is largely manmade, the result of overgrazing, faulty irrigation, deforestation, perhaps combined with a shift in the course of a jetstream.” –Paul and Anne Ehrlich in “Population, Resources, Environment” (1970).

See book extract below …

Joel Salatin first made me aware of this in his book “Salad Bar Beef” and most of mainstream science disagrees with this view. But Ehrlich is a bit independent which is rare for scientists.

As for evidence supporting Ehrlich’s claim above, Ehrlich himself does not provide any … I suppose at the time he wrote it, he thought it was self evident. But now, with mainstream scientists making up wild fantasies about 200+ “Green Sahara Periods” (they even give this an acronym – GSPs) and Milankovitch Cycles over millions and millions of years, it is helpful to have some supporting evidence for Ehrlich’s claim.

The best evidence I have found comes from cave paintings found in southeastern Algeria, which is smack dab in the middle of the present day Sahara Desert.

The Pastoral Period (or ‘Bovidian period’) from around 7,200 BC to 3,000 BC is the dominant period in terms of the number of paintings, during which there is the representation of bovine herds and the scenes of daily life. They have an aesthetic naturalistic realism to them and are among the best known examples of prehistoric mural art.

The Horse and Libyan Warrior Period (‘Equidian period’), which dates from approximately 3200 BC to 1000 BC, covers the end of the Neolithic and protohistoric periods, which corresponds to the disappearance of numerous species from the effects of progressive desiccation and to the appearance of the horse. Horses have also been depicted pulling chariots, driven by whip-wielding unarmed charioteers, suggesting that the chariots were not used for fighting, but possibly for hunting. However, chariots with wooden wheels could not have been driven across the rocky Sahara and into the mountains where many of the chariot paintings occur.

Some of the last artistic images reflect the taming of camels in the aptly named Camel Period, which dates from around 2,000 BC to 1,000 BC. This period coincided with the onset of the hyper-arid desert climate and with the appearance of the dromedary (a camel with one hump on its back). http://www.ancient-origins.net/ancient-places-africa/15000-artworks-over-ten-millennia-reveal-evolution-human-life-edge-sahara

Some things to note here …

1) It didn’t become hyper-arid until the 2000 BC – 1000 BC range, much later than the mainstream view.
2) The “Pastoral Period” is dominant in terms of number of paintings and includes depictions of bovine herds. And since overgrazing is causing desertification today, it is likely that it also caused desertification in the past.
3) The timeframe for the Pastoral Period is skewed. See the work of GRISDA physicist RH Brown. I believe he has co-authored a book which contains this called “Origin by Design.”

Note to self: Gotta read this book sometime … http://www.amazon.com/rape-earth-world-survey-erosion/dp/B00086L0IC

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